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Tuesday, 13-May-2014 11:24 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Amid Controversy, Japan Weighs Reinterpreting Its Pacifist Const












He points out that Japan cannot come to the aid of an ally under attack under the current Constitution. Abe is basically looking for the easiest way to change the Constitution, says Koichi Nakano, a political science professor at their website Sophia University in Tokyo. Having postponed outright constitutional reform last year, Mr. Nakano says that Abe thinks that by reinterpreting the ban on collective self-defense and stripping all meaning from Article 9, he can later come back to voters and say Article 9 is outdated, so why not change that too? This review is just a Trojan horse." Public opposition Securing New Komeitos support in exchange for concessions on other policies down the road promises to be far more straightforward than constitutional revision. After floating constitutional reform early on in his administration, Abe appeared shaken by the strength of public opposition, with polls consistently showing a majority of voters in favor of keeping the supreme law in its current form. Supporters of reform point to shortfalls in the current constitutional arrangements that could eventually endanger Japanese territory: an attack, say, on US naval ships in or near Japans waters to visit site which Tokyo would be unable to respond with force. "If we stick to this position, Japan won't be able to exercise the necessary deterrence to defend our own national security or to keep peace and stability in the region, said Takeshi Iwaya, a senior LDP lawmaker in charge of the party's defense policy. US response Barack Obama welcomed the review click here! of collective self-defense after his recent visit to Tokyo, since it would enable Japanese forces to play a more hands-on role in the bilateral security treaty. And last month, Dennis Blair, the former commander-in-chief of the US Pacific Command, said Japans self-defense forces need to have more flexibility to operate in accordance with their country's interests. Abe's personal connection Whatever the outcome of the re-interpretation debate, Abe is unlikely to abandon his ultimate aim of revising the Constitution, revered by Japans large pacifist movement but reviled by conservatives, including Abe's grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, who was prime minister in the late 1950s. <br>Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0512/Amid-controversy-Japan-weighs-reinterpreting-its-pacifist-Constitution-video



Tuesday, 13-May-2014 11:15 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Amid Controversy, Japan Weighs Reinterpreting Its Pacifist Const












He points out that Japan cannot come to the aid of an ally under attack under the current Constitution. Abe is basically looking for the easiest way to change the Constitution, says Koichi Nakano, a political science professor at their website Sophia University in Tokyo. Having postponed outright constitutional reform last year, Mr. Nakano says that Abe thinks that by reinterpreting the ban on collective self-defense and stripping all meaning from Article 9, he can later come back to voters and say Article 9 is outdated, so why not change that too? This review is just a Trojan horse." Public opposition Securing New Komeitos support in exchange for concessions on other policies down the road promises to be far more straightforward than constitutional revision. After floating constitutional reform early on in his administration, Abe appeared shaken by the strength of public opposition, with polls consistently showing a majority of voters in favor of keeping the supreme law in its current form. Supporters of reform point to shortfalls in the current constitutional arrangements that could eventually endanger Japanese territory: an attack, say, on US naval ships in or near Japans waters to visit site which Tokyo would be unable to respond with force. "If we stick to this position, Japan won't be able to exercise the necessary deterrence to defend our own national security or to keep peace and stability in the region, said Takeshi Iwaya, a senior LDP lawmaker in charge of the party's defense policy. US response Barack Obama welcomed the review click here! of collective self-defense after his recent visit to Tokyo, since it would enable Japanese forces to play a more hands-on role in the bilateral security treaty. And last month, Dennis Blair, the former commander-in-chief of the US Pacific Command, said Japans self-defense forces need to have more flexibility to operate in accordance with their country's interests. Abe's personal connection Whatever the outcome of the re-interpretation debate, Abe is unlikely to abandon his ultimate aim of revising the Constitution, revered by Japans large pacifist movement but reviled by conservatives, including Abe's grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, who was prime minister in the late 1950s. <br>Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0512/Amid-controversy-Japan-weighs-reinterpreting-its-pacifist-Constitution-video



Tuesday, 13-May-2014 11:13 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Amid Controversy, Japan Weighs Reinterpreting Its Pacifist Const












He points out that Japan cannot come to the aid of an ally under attack under the current Constitution. Abe is basically looking for the easiest way to change the Constitution, says Koichi Nakano, a political science professor at their website Sophia University in Tokyo. Having postponed outright constitutional reform last year, Mr. Nakano says that Abe thinks that by reinterpreting the ban on collective self-defense and stripping all meaning from Article 9, he can later come back to voters and say Article 9 is outdated, so why not change that too? This review is just a Trojan horse." Public opposition Securing New Komeitos support in exchange for concessions on other policies down the road promises to be far more straightforward than constitutional revision. After floating constitutional reform early on in his administration, Abe appeared shaken by the strength of public opposition, with polls consistently showing a majority of voters in favor of keeping the supreme law in its current form. Supporters of reform point to shortfalls in the current constitutional arrangements that could eventually endanger Japanese territory: an attack, say, on US naval ships in or near Japans waters to visit site which Tokyo would be unable to respond with force. "If we stick to this position, Japan won't be able to exercise the necessary deterrence to defend our own national security or to keep peace and stability in the region, said Takeshi Iwaya, a senior LDP lawmaker in charge of the party's defense policy. US response Barack Obama welcomed the review click here! of collective self-defense after his recent visit to Tokyo, since it would enable Japanese forces to play a more hands-on role in the bilateral security treaty. And last month, Dennis Blair, the former commander-in-chief of the US Pacific Command, said Japans self-defense forces need to have more flexibility to operate in accordance with their country's interests. Abe's personal connection Whatever the outcome of the re-interpretation debate, Abe is unlikely to abandon his ultimate aim of revising the Constitution, revered by Japans large pacifist movement but reviled by conservatives, including Abe's grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, who was prime minister in the late 1950s. <br>Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0512/Amid-controversy-Japan-weighs-reinterpreting-its-pacifist-Constitution-video



Tuesday, 13-May-2014 11:13 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Amid Controversy, Japan Weighs Reinterpreting Its Pacifist Const












He points out that Japan cannot come to the aid of an ally under attack under the current Constitution. Abe is basically looking for the easiest way to change the Constitution, says Koichi Nakano, a political science professor at their website Sophia University in Tokyo. Having postponed outright constitutional reform last year, Mr. Nakano says that Abe thinks that by reinterpreting the ban on collective self-defense and stripping all meaning from Article 9, he can later come back to voters and say Article 9 is outdated, so why not change that too? This review is just a Trojan horse." Public opposition Securing New Komeitos support in exchange for concessions on other policies down the road promises to be far more straightforward than constitutional revision. After floating constitutional reform early on in his administration, Abe appeared shaken by the strength of public opposition, with polls consistently showing a majority of voters in favor of keeping the supreme law in its current form. Supporters of reform point to shortfalls in the current constitutional arrangements that could eventually endanger Japanese territory: an attack, say, on US naval ships in or near Japans waters to visit site which Tokyo would be unable to respond with force. "If we stick to this position, Japan won't be able to exercise the necessary deterrence to defend our own national security or to keep peace and stability in the region, said Takeshi Iwaya, a senior LDP lawmaker in charge of the party's defense policy. US response Barack Obama welcomed the review click here! of collective self-defense after his recent visit to Tokyo, since it would enable Japanese forces to play a more hands-on role in the bilateral security treaty. And last month, Dennis Blair, the former commander-in-chief of the US Pacific Command, said Japans self-defense forces need to have more flexibility to operate in accordance with their country's interests. Abe's personal connection Whatever the outcome of the re-interpretation debate, Abe is unlikely to abandon his ultimate aim of revising the Constitution, revered by Japans large pacifist movement but reviled by conservatives, including Abe's grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, who was prime minister in the late 1950s. <br>Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2014/0512/Amid-controversy-Japan-weighs-reinterpreting-its-pacifist-Constitution-video



Wednesday, 7-May-2014 19:49 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Japan Stem-cell Researcher Obokata Is Hospitalized - Japan Real










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